Neve Campbell and the Killer Spider Dilemma

I’m a fan of horror films: they remind me that things could always be worse, and if everything goes to pot I’m safe in the knowledge that I haven’t yet had to saw off my own foot. My late night decision to watch Mia Farrow and her fabulous pixie cut get knocked up by the devil always comes back to haunt me though: anytime my best friend abandons our place of residence for the week I’m left feeling like Drew Barrymore and the remains of her burnt popcorn.

Sure, there are perks to being in the house alone: just this morning I peed with the door open and danced around the kitchen in my underwear listening to Demi Lovato: I’m sure the neighbours loved that. Unfortunately, I haven’t yet developed a fool-proof plan to deal with the killer spiders that everyone on Facebook insists on posting about multiple times a day.

I’ve tried almost everything, from locking said spider in the kitchen and deciding this is the month I’m going to go on the ‘I can’t get to the fridge’ diet, to jumping over the sofa, screaming and hoping the mere sound of my voice sends every spider in the vicinity running for miles: nothing seems to work! I’ll just have to implement the only spider capturing method that’s ever really worked for me: asking a stranger from the flat upstairs to do it instead: Neve Campbell would be so proud.

Writers Block and Taking Notes from Superman

It’s been over two months since I’ve written anything of substance. The only form of writing I’ve done as of late is texting my best friend to ask her when she would be returning home to give me attention. Just like Justin Bieber, I’m a shell of my former self. I even had to google the word ‘Bieber’ to check I’d spelt it correctly, which might actually be an indication that I’ve not lost the plot quite yet. Like bingo calling or riding a bike, it’s been so long since I’ve done it, I can barely remember how.

On multiple occasions I’ve torn myself away from my beloved Gilmore Girls boxset and bag of doritos to try and document my thought processes and interesting events that have happened to me in recent weeks. I sit at my laptop, fingers poised to write something quirky and relatable with just the faintest hint of indignation when I have the terrible realisation that I have nothing interesting to write about: fascinating tales about spending a Saturday morning with toothpaste in my eye isn’t going to make J.K Rowling start quaking in her boots.

As the self-indulgent fear of leading a mundane life, which can’t be documented in a humorous tone over the internet clouds any desire to blog, I’ve decided to make a change in my life. I’m going to become a better person so that karma helps me win the lottery and attend yacht parties with Taylor Swift. Also, doing good deeds is rewarding, as there’s no greater pleasure in life than being able to help other people, obviously.

First port of call: giving up my seat on public transport. Not to worry, I’m not a complete monster, I already make sure that no elderly people are left clutching their walking stick whilst I stare at the floor and ignore any pangs of guilt. Rather, I plan to broaden my horizons and become the Florence Nightingale of public transport, ready to give up my seat at a moments notice to anyone in need! Not only do I burn extra calories per minute but I also gain a full view of any attractive men on the train that I might accidentally bump into whilst struggling with my tights and cape. Everyone’s a winner!

For now though, I’m so exhausted from all of the thinking about becoming a more fully-functioning human I’ve been doing, that I simply must put myself to bed with a cup of tea and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. It’s good to be back!

Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word.

It feels rather narcissistic to start by apologising for not posting anything lately, who do I think I am, the Queen of England? Nevertheless, it seems rather rude not to explain my absence, so for the couple of people that might read this, I’m still alive in body if not in spirit!

I try not to write anything too personal here: I’d much rather post a few badly written puns and a speech about my love for Taylor Swift than something that might expose too much of myself. Also, I find it hard to imagine anyone caring about my troubles when they undoubtedly have much bigger ones of their own to deal with: this isn’t therapy.

I might delete this yet, whilst typing I feel slightly foolish: I’ve been struggling with my anxiety lately. There, I said it. It reminds me of the time I tried to tell a guy I liked him but couldn’t get the words out, so I typed it on my phone and showed it to him instead. I’m not sure which situation was more painful. Anyway, as I’ve been feeling pretty low I decided to take a break from blogging to spend time with friends and family to get out of my own head for a while.

In all honesty, not much has changed. I still love cheese and wine and have a deep, inner hatred for queue jumpers and public transport: it’s like I’ve never been away.

Taylor Swift and the Lucky Golden Ticket

Reading has always been one of my most cherished past-times: as a child I spent hours flicking through the pages of Enid Blyton, J.K Rowling and Roald Dahl, drinking in their words. I was with Charlie, hoping to find a Wonka bar that contained that lucky, golden ticket. I was stood next to Matilda as she defeated Miss Trunchbull and finally found the love she always craved; I wasn’t alone. Any problems I had suddenly seemed superfluous and all that remained was the story and the characters of the book: my friends.

Whilst the words created by my most loved authors captured my imagination as a child, nowadays, the sounds of Taylor Swift and the sweet accompaniment of a bottle of red wine are far more likely to entice me on a Monday night. So earlier this year I made it my mission to read 25 books before I turn 25; the concept is adorable and I need to create goals for myself so I foolishly believe that my life has meaning.

Unfortunately, as someone with commitment issues,  I intend to follow through with everything I set my mind to but the execution isn’t quite there yet. Couple that with a love for binge-watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer and I’ve fallen off the reading bandwagon, and picked up a few library fines along the way.

I’m not a child anymore, I don’t have imaginary friends or climb into my wardrobe hoping to find Narnia: I can watch the film on Netflix instead, but isn’t that a crying shame? It’s about time I turned off my laptop and reconnected with some old friends: I think they’ve missed me.

Is there anything you’ve read lately that you’d recommend to spice up my bookshelf? 

Harry Potter and the Summer Wardrobe Catastrophe

As it’s almost the middle of July, and my desire to cry and drink Pimm’s is at an all-time high, I’ve finally decided to admit defeat and join the rest of the world in celebrating summer. Unfortunately, my wardrobe doesn’t quite match my mind set; I’d love to spend the next few months wearing woollen tights and oversized cat t-shirts but both society and the weather seem to frown upon that.

In search of a solution to my clothing issues, I spent the afternoon shopping for pieces that would further my plans to emulate the current queen of boho, Vanessa Hudgens. However, whilst trying on a multitude of patterned dresses and kimonos, I spotted something that changed any plans I had to look summer chic: Harry Potter t-shirts.

After 15 minutes of sitting on the changing room floor, torn between the Hufflepuff and Slytherin shirts, both two sizes too small for me, I realised: selecting my summer wardrobe is the least of my problems.

The Art of Successfully Accepting a Compliment

Accepting compliments isn’t my strong suit. In my head, I flutter my eyelashes and flick my hair with a confident-sounding “thank you for the kind words” but the reality is rather different.

Quite often, I find myself attempting to justify the way I look to the person flattering me in a bizarre tirade, filled with insecurity and self-doubt.

“Oh, I only put a dress on because I’m out to dinner later! I’m going straight after work and the restaurant is rather fancy so I don’t want to look out of place. It’s silly, I know; I hope I don’t look too ridiculous! I’ll be back to resembling a garden gnome tomorrow, don’t you worry!”

This makes it clear to the individual trying to compliment me that I feel uncomfortable with this particular conversation and would prefer to discuss the weather. They usually leave the room afterwards, so it works like a charm.

Unfortunately, I still haven’t mastered the skill of responding to the backhanded compliment. A pre-coffee conversation with a work-colleague this morning is a classic example.

 “You look nice today Helen, I see you put some make-up on!”

“Yeah, I had some extra time this morning so I thought I’d get my spade out and go to town.”

“It looks good, you don’t usually make an effort.”

I wish I’d replied with wit and sass, but in reality I mumbled a quick “thanks” and told her what a lovely top she was wearing. Next time, I’ll ask whether she borrowed it from her mother.

Never Been Kissed and The Cultural Stereotype

I was catching up with my talented friend, Alex this morning when she mentioned watching the 90’s rom-com classic, ‘Never Been Kissed’ and its resemblance to our high-school experience. Just like Drew, I didn’t exactly win any popularity contests as a teenager, and resided at the bottom of the food chain throughout my years in education.

Every day I’d wake up, complete my work and talk to as little people as possible along the way. Despite never being the most intelligent member of the class, my shy and insecure personality meant I often faced a barrage of name-calling. Spiff, geek, and loser: you name it, I heard it. Never the most colourful set of insults, but they still get points for trying.

Admittedly, I also used to tarnish everyone that dared insinuate I was a loser with the same brush: air-heads who have nothing better to do with their time than insult me. I silently planned my revenge rather than postulating my theory out loud, but I’m just as guilty for pre-judging based on assumption as those who bullied me.

The quiet, insecure teenager that used to dread social interaction still remains, but with age comes confidence and the ability to care less what people think. Cultural stereotypes will always exist in a society obsessed with image, but if Hermione Granger can successfully make geek chic, so can I.